After you’ve identified a new provider to hold your rollover IRA, you should be able to go ahead and complete the account application process. You will need an account in which to deposit your funds, completing your IRA rollover. Setting up your account before starting the rollover process will help ensure that the funds are deposited within the 60-day window.
There are a number of "safe harbor" provisions that can allow a company to be exempted from the ADP test. This includes making a "safe harbor" employer contribution to employees' accounts. Safe harbor contributions can take the form of a match (generally totaling 4% of pay) or a non-elective profit sharing (totaling 3% of pay). Safe harbor 401(k) contributions must be 100% vested at all times with immediate eligibility for employees. There are other administrative requirements within the safe harbor, such as requiring the employer to notify all eligible employees of the opportunity to participate in the plan, and restricting the employer from suspending participants for any reason other than due to a hardship withdrawal. 

An indirect rollover allows for the transferring of assets from a tax-deferred 401(k) plan to a traditional IRA. With this method, the funds are given to the employee via check to be deposited into their own personal account. With an indirect rollover, it is up to the employee to redeposit the funds into the new IRA within the allotted 60 day period to avoid penalty.
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The first thing to know about a 401(k) rollover to IRA is that not everyone can do it. If you’re still working for the company, for example, you probably can’t roll money out of your 401(k) into an IRA. However, you may be eligible for a rollover IRA if your employer’s plan allows in-service distributions, if you get a short-term layoff or if your company is acquired or reorganized.
The Charitable IRA Rollover provides taxpayers with a mechanism for transferring their annual Required Minimum Distributions directly to charitable organizations, in order to exclude the distributions from their taxable income while simultaneously supporting the charities of their choice. This rollover is an attractive option for taxpayers who either don’t want or don’t need the extra taxable income from their IRA’s required minimum distribution.
If, for example, you do a 401(k) rollover to IRA and later contribute to your rollover IRA (as you would to a traditional IRA) or if you combine that rollover IRA with assets from another IRA, you may be limited in what you can do with your rollover IRA in the future. If you joined a new company, you would not be able to roll that account into your new 401(k).

If you have not elected a direct rollover, in the case of a distribution from a retirement plan, or you have not elected out of withholding in the case of a distribution from an IRA, your plan administrator or IRA trustee will withhold taxes from your distribution. If you later roll the distribution over within 60 days, you must use other funds to make up for the amount withheld.
To help ensure that companies extend their 401(k) plans to low-paid employees, an IRS rule limits the maximum deferral by the company's highly compensated employees (HCEs) based on the average deferral by the company's non-highly compensated employees (NHCEs). If the less compensated employees save more for retirement, then the HCEs are allowed to save more for retirement. This provision is enforced via "non-discrimination testing". Non-discrimination testing takes the deferral rates of HCEs and compares them to NHCEs. In 2008, an HCE was defined as an employee with compensation greater than $100,000 in 2007, or as an employee that owned more than 5% of the business at any time during the year or the preceding year.[32] In addition to the $100,000 limit for determining HCEs, employers can elect to limit the top-paid group of employees to the top 20% of employees ranked by compensation.[32] That is, for plans with the first day of the plan-year in the 2007 calendar year, HCEs are employees who earned more than $100,000 in gross compensation (also known as 'Medicare wages') in the prior year. For example, most testing done in 2009 was for the 2008 plan-year, which compared 2007 plan-year gross compensation to the $100,000 threshold in order to determine who was an HCE and who was an NHCE. The threshold was $125,000 for 2019, and is $130,000 for 2020.[28]
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